Psalms in prayer from a parish in Prague
Muezzins mustering from mosques in Mashhad
Incantations in India, Dinka drums deafening
Baha’i and Buddhist brainstorming beliefs
Holy Hebrew homily hailing Hanukkah
Small Shinto shrines soliciting sprites

Discordant words beg all souls to be peaceful
Riding their camels through eyes of their needle

39 thoughts on “Needlegate

  1. I LOVED the alliterative allegory, I was fascinated with the form and function which found its mark; … I BELIEVE that all of our religious realms are merely gathering points along our trajectory to the TRUTH…the basic tenants of each group are the same…and have provided the foundations for civility …. But if we pass through these “gates” on our way to the light and truth…. Do we not get further from our religions and closer to each other?

  2. I’ve always liked that little throwaway line of JC’s about the rich man and the camel and whatnot. Nice to see you using it here. Hope the righteous and rich caravan gets stuck in it though.

  3. pi314chron says:

    You’ve shown Swinburne to be a pitiful poetaster when it comes to the powerful potential of alliteration. Excellent work, Mike. — Ron —

    • Just a device here to contrast harmony and dissonance Ron but I’ll gladly file your great compliment away for my next bout with writer’s drought. Many thanks.

  4. penetrating memories, intrigue dark beauty into holy solitude …when I can read between the lines and seize the structure of your play – peaceful and beautiful Mike

      • That’s a big question. Maybe I should rephrase. Let’s try this: Maybe you get inspired by daily sights and sounds, or something on the news or in the paper or in a novel that you think would be great reinterpreted as a poem. Does it inspire you the thrill of boiling long narratives down to the most concise eloquent essence? Getting to the root of it in rhyme? And then again, maybe there is no answer… Although now you’ve set me to thinking…what’s it like to be a poet in today’s world? Hmmm…

  5. Love the image – and the effective use you make of alliteration and assonance. You’ve kept it short – and it suits the topic. Lots to recommend this one, Mike :)

Whaddya think?

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in: Logo

You are commenting using your account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s